07 Nov 2014

Walking in Aukland

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When 24-year-old aspiring actress Shoshana Roberts was filmed with a hidden camera walking around New York in a plain T-shirt, jeans and trainers she received 108 “catcalls”.

Roberts’ social experiment has spawned many spoof videos since it came out, but recently, a model from Auckland, New Zealand, decided to conduct Roberts’ experiment in her native land.

The results are shockingly different.

Unlike Roberts who was stopped over 100 times, Simpson was only stopped twice. But how she was stopped in these situations were completely different.

The first time Simpson was stopped, an Italian man chased after her to ask if she was from Italy. The man then proceeded to apologize for stopping her. The second time was simply a man asking her for directions.

New York City is home to 8.4 million people, while Auckland only has a population of 1.3 million. That may have something to do with the difference in reactions, but it definitely doesn’t explain all of it. As you can probably tell, there’s just a culture difference at play.

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3 Feedbacks on "Walking in Aukland"

GoneWithTheWind

I have never been to New Zealand but I have certainly met people from New Zealand and I think I understand the difference. I go to Canada a lot and often say Canadians are just like Americans except that they have manners. I think that applies to New Zealanders as well. Not that they didn’t find her attractive but just that their upbringing prevented them from expressing it rudely.



FunkyPhD

Roberts wasn’t stopped. She was spoken to, often with gentility and friendliness. Only in the hothouse world of the “War against Women” is a genial greeting an instance of harassment.



Steve Gregg

Nearly all the catcalls in the New York video came from black men. How many black people are there in New Zealand?



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